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Thread: Asian hornets in Tetbury

  1. #11
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    From an earlier statement:

    Asian Hornet update. Following the recent discovery of two Asian Hornet (Vespa velutina) workers near Tetbury in Gloucestershire, Bee Inspectors from the National Bee Unit have visited over 100 sites in the local area. Asian Hornets were found at six locations within 500m of the original sighting.

    Impressive scale of search but it does make me wonder ....

    - flights of Asian hornet workers seem rather short if the six locations were within 500m of the original sighting
    - only one site of six with hunting hornets was reported, the others found by inspectors

    This all seems a bit needle in a haystack. There must be a chance that there are more out there and this nest wasn't established by the first queen to make it to these shores. If the radius affected is short and most folk with bee hives don't notice or report the issue then it would be easy for there to be others and we're just seeing the colony of one daughter or grand-daughter of the first one.

    Also interested to hear whether there was evidence either way about new queens produced by this colony. It looks a fair size.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gavin View Post
    From an earlier statement:

    Asian Hornet update. Following the recent discovery of two Asian Hornet (Vespa velutina) workers near Tetbury in Gloucestershire, Bee Inspectors from the National Bee Unit have visited over 100 sites in the local area. Asian Hornets were found at six locations within 500m of the original sighting.

    Impressive scale of search but it does make me wonder ....

    - flights of Asian hornet workers seem rather short if the six locations were within 500m of the original sighting
    - only one site of six with hunting hornets was reported, the others found by inspectors

    This all seems a bit needle in a haystack. There must be a chance that there are more out there and this nest wasn't established by the first queen to make it to these shores. If the radius affected is short and most folk with bee hives don't notice or report the issue then it would be easy for there to be others and we're just seeing the colony of one daughter or grand-daughter of the first one.

    Also interested to hear whether there was evidence either way about new queens produced by this colony. It looks a fair size.
    That nest is impressive! They are such cool insects.....a pity they are / can be so devastating. Sounds like the NBU have done well and I am sure they are thinking similar questions to yourself Gav. Amazing this can go undetected. I wonder if the nest was removed intact or destroyed in situ ? Maybe if the former could it be examined for signs of queen dispersal ?

  3. #13
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    Was the nest removed and examined?
    There would probably be evidence of any queen production.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon View Post
    Was the nest removed and examined?
    There would probably be evidence of any queen production.
    What would the evidence be Jon ? Interesting to know.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    I am supposing that queens are raised in special cells and there would be queen larvae or young queens present.

  6. #16
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Okey dokey, it's all kicking off now ......

    http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/public/News/news.cfm#177

    October 2016 - A confirmed finding of Asian hornet north of the Mendip Hills in Somerset

    As with the first sighting, work to find, destroy and remove any nests is already underway, and includes:

    • setting up a three mile surveillance zone around the location of the initial sighting
    • opening a local control centre to coordinate the response
    • deploying bee inspectors across the area who will use infrared cameras and traps to locate any nests
    • readying nest disposal experts who will use pesticides to kill the hornets and destroy any nests

    Bee inspectors in Somerset will be supported by nest disposal experts who will use an approved pesticide to destroy any hornets and remove any nests.

    The first Asian hornet confirmed in the UK was discovered in the Tetbury area. A nest in the area has since been found, treated with pesticide and destroyed. No further live Asian hornets have been sighted in the area since the nest was removed.

    Husbandry Advice:

    It is very important that beekeepers remain vigilant and monitor their apiaries and surrounding forage for any Asian hornet activity. At this time of the year, Asian hornets can be seen foraging on the ivy for nectar and preying on other foraging insects for protein.

    Traps should also be hung out and closely monitored. When using bait, please refrain from using light beer or lager mixed with sugar as this does not work. In France a Dark beer, mixed with 25ml of strawberry syrup and 25ml of orange liqueur has proven to work well.
    Additionally, a protein bait of mashed fish e.g. prawns or trout, diluted to 25% has also proven effective. Anyone wishing to make their own traps may find the following factsheet useful: How to make a homemade Asian hornet monitoring trap.

    Further guidance on identifying the Asian hornet can be found on the Asian hornet pages of Beebase where you will find a very useful Asian hornet ID sheet and Asian hornet poster. Any suspected Asian hornet sightings should be reported to alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk.

    If you are not sure, please still send in a sample for ID or report any sightings. When emailing, please include your name, the location of the sighting and if possible, a photograph of the hornet. Please do not put yourself in any danger of getting stung when trying to take a photo.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gavin View Post
    Okey dokey, it's all kicking off now ......

    http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/public/News/news.cfm#177

    October 2016 - A confirmed finding of Asian hornet north of the Mendip Hills in Somerset

    As with the first sighting, work to find, destroy and remove any nests is already underway, and includes:

    setting up a three mile surveillance zone around the location of the initial sighting
    opening a local control centre to coordinate the response
    deploying bee inspectors across the area who will use infrared cameras and traps to locate any nests
    readying nest disposal experts who will use pesticides to kill the hornets and destroy any nests

    Bee inspectors in Somerset will be supported by nest disposal experts who will use an approved pesticide to destroy any hornets and remove any nests.

    The first Asian hornet confirmed in the UK was discovered in the Tetbury area. A nest in the area has since been found, treated with pesticide and destroyed. No further live Asian hornets have been sighted in the area since the nest was removed.

    Husbandry Advice:

    It is very important that beekeepers remain vigilant and monitor their apiaries and surrounding forage for any Asian hornet activity. At this time of the year, Asian hornets can be seen foraging on the ivy for nectar and preying on other foraging insects for protein.

    Traps should also be hung out and closely monitored. When using bait, please refrain from using light beer or lager mixed with sugar as this does not work. In France a Dark beer, mixed with 25ml of strawberry syrup and 25ml of orange liqueur has proven to work well.
    Additionally, a protein bait of mashed fish e.g. prawns or trout, diluted to 25% has also proven effective. Anyone wishing to make their own traps may find the following factsheet useful: How to make a homemade Asian hornet monitoring trap.

    Further guidance on identifying the Asian hornet can be found on the Asian hornet pages of Beebase where you will find a very useful Asian hornet ID sheet and Asian hornet poster. Any suspected Asian hornet sightings should be reported to alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk.

    If you are not sure, please still send in a sample for ID or report any sightings. When emailing, please include your name, the location of the sighting and if possible, a photograph of the hornet. Please do not put yourself in any danger of getting stung when trying to take a photo.
    So what your saying is I need to brew more dark beers.

  8. #18
    Senior Member fatshark's Avatar
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    Isn't he also saying it's clearly moving South West and is therefore no threat to Scottish beekeeping ... unlike your dark beer?

  9. #19

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    Gavin quoted "When using bait, please refrain from using light beer or lager mixed with sugar as this does not work. In France a Dark beer, mixed with 25ml of strawberry syrup and 25ml of orange liqueur has proven to work well."
    This French bait sounds much too delicious to feed to hornets - I will try it tonight if the barman in my local will make it for me.
    Alan.

  10. #20
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatshark View Post
    Isn't he also saying it's clearly moving South West and is therefore no threat to Scottish beekeeping ... unlike your dark beer?
    My spies in Sand Hutton tell me that their array of harmonic radar devices detected a front of Vespa velutina queens heading roughly NE and making for Aberdeenshire. Apparently they stopped off at one of Murray's apiaries mere miles from Tetbury where they heard tales of summer weather in Aberdeenshire ... and so a few stopped in their tracks and set up home nearby but the rest turned round and headed back to La Manche. You should be safe for a while, GG.

    That cocktail sounds fearsome, Alan. Let us know what the hangover feels like.

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