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Thread: Will I live to regret this.

  1. #11
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
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    Came across this video on their life cycle,
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fE4emUMyOWs

  2. #12
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    I,m asking as I don't have much confidence in these counts. My own experience at broodless OA treatment time often bore little relationship to what I thought was going on in August. This is my second year giving a 1 week FA treatment halfway through August, only 1 hive showed a slightly higher count at 600 the rest were<50. I'll still treat them with OA come the time.
    I used the Snelgrove board again this year and I think the brood break does seem restrict varroa expansion.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
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    Maybe this should be a different thread but can bees be taught to remove mites, Honey Bees have a complex social structure. Their roles vary with their age house bee, nursing bee, queen attendant, guard bee, forager they decide to make new queens and to swarm, they communicate with one another as to where food sources are available via different dances on the comb.
    All of the above described behaviors are probably not learned by a bee but are probably encoded in their DNA, but I assume they must have an ability to learn, so do older bees teach younger bees, therefore if you have workers who have the ability to to remove mites could they be transfered to another hive to teach younger bees the skill.
    Bees learn how to locate the hive when to go out forageing this cannot be in their DNA especially if you move them or unite them with bees in a different apiary. They can relate to the pheremone in the hive which allows them locate it and recoginise fellow members of the hive and prevent others from entering except drones from other hives. so can they be taught by other bees. (Way too much time for thinking)

  4. #14

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    Hi GG
    Bees learn where the hive is and if you mess them about they learn to identify you as an enemy
    They know the smell of a wrong un flying up to the door of their honey bank although they are more concerned with unwelcome withdrawals than deposits when opening the door to visitors
    They might not learn how to identify varroa so easily though https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fE4emUMyOWs
    Check that lecture out if you haven't already
    Incidentally while transferring bees from a nuc to full size hive I stumbled and did a dance on the extra combs
    Bees showed no more interest in the foundation after the dance than before though

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