Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 61

Thread: 2012: Module 6

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    Trophallaxis (there seems to be some


    Photos Of Trophallaxis in action

    Changes In The Thoracic Temperature Of Honeybees While Receiving Nectar From Foragers Collecting At Different Reward Rates (you didn't think it would take this long did you?)

    Protein trophallaxis and the regulation of pollen foraging by honey bees

    Honeybee, Apis mellifera, round dance is influenced by trace components of floral nectar

    Just for Doris, this one caught my eye, but I can't get the whole study:

    Quote Originally Posted by N. W. M. van Buren, A. G. H. MariŽn, H. H. W. Velthuis
    It is claimed that Perizin, a pesticide to control the mite Varroa jacobsoni, acts systemically and is distributed by trophallaxis of the bees. We studied the role of trophallactic interactions in the distribution of coumaphos, the active ingredient, among the colony members and whether coumaphos can reach all mites by systemic activity. Colonies were divided into three compartments by a screen, one receiving a Perizin treatment by sprinkling, the others receiving no Perizin. In this way it was possible to trace the amount of coumaphos transferred between bees through the screen from the treated part to the untreated one by trophallaxis. After different periods of time the number of fallen mites was counted and the amount of coumaphos in bees was determined for all hive compartments. We found that trophallactic interactions are of minor importance in the distribution of Perizin between the two compartments. The recommended method of sprinkling Perizin over the bees was shown to be very inefficient; only 24% of the applied amount reaches the alimentary canal of the bees; the rest must therefore remain at other places: on the outside of the bees, in the combs and on the hive-parts.
    Olfactory learning by means of trophallaxis in Apis mellifera
    Last edited by Neils; 14-06-2012 at 12:25 AM.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    Bee/Waggle Dance and DorsoVentral Abdominal Vibration (DVAV)

    Honeybee, Apis mellifera, round dance is influenced by trace components of floral nectar This is also linked in the Trophallaxis section because a forum isn't great for organising links.

    Deciding to learn: modulation of learning flights in honeybees,
    Apis mellifera


    DVAV in Action
    Last edited by Neils; 18-06-2012 at 10:39 PM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    For no other reason than I've been at this all night after 18 hours of software testing and my head hurts:

    They aren't that smart:



    Though if you do want to try and make a serious point about it, what can you work out from the flight of the incoming/outgoing bees?

  4. #14

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    Foraging: 6.7 the behaviour of the foraging bee and its work methods in the field including orientation;

    Long-distance pollen flow assessment through evaluation of pollinator foraging range suggests transgene escape distances

    distance estimation by foraging honeybees

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    Even I get bored of studies eventually

    How to Make a Pound of Honey

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    I'm committed, the form and cheque is in the post! For a subject I thought I knew a reasonable amount about, I'm a little concerned, I thought module 5 was too difficult.
    Last edited by Neils; 19-09-2012 at 02:36 AM.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    I have a lot of the past BBKA papers in my possession. I'll look at them in more detail over the next few days but if there is one thing that leaps out at me at the moment is the number of times big mark questions around swarming crops up. What causes it, how it develops from initiation to settling a new 'home' and so on.

    Sacbrood also seems to crop up a lot.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    1,852
    Blog Entries
    35

    Default

    Go on then, I'm stuck on the first part of this question:

    Some flowers have "lines" on their petals . What are they called and what is the significance of these lines with regard to foraging behaviour?
    I have no idea what the lines are called and my google-fu has let me down.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    400 miles S of Stonehaven
    Posts
    398

    Default

    I haven't done any modules, but I can't imagine the answer changes depending on scientific discipline.

    The lines are nectar guides.

    The theory is that bees see the UV spectrum, so see flowers differently from us. The lines show up more clearly to bees, and presumably other pollinating insects, and guide them towards the nectary.

    Some pictures showing 'normal', UV and IR flowers on this site http://www.naturfotograf.com/UV_flowers_list.html

    Is this any use to you? http://blog.mbbka.org.uk/category/ed...bbka-module-6/

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •