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Thread: Wintering Double Brood Box

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam View Post
    Jim, you have treated for varroa which we can assume has been successful which is an excellent start and your bees have plenty of stores. I can understand that you don't want them to starve and as you are new to this game want to be absolutely sure, however a double brood box hive (in my part of Scotland) if pretty full of stores, shouldn't need fondant added. The bees will work upwards through winter, eating their way through their stores. What helps conserve stores and also helps the colony is to insulate a wooden hive and you are right (in my view) to have insulated them. Shade can be helpful in the summer but sun in the winter warms the hive and allows bees to break cluster and move around - and more importantly move their stores if they need, so a pleasant not wind-swept and not damp and boggy site is also beneficial.
    Hi Adam, thanks for your reply , I feel a bit better now after hearing other points of view etc. I still find myself every weekend or so going up to and listening to the hive noise , sticking my ear to the outside of the brood box. It is at least a way of hearing if they are still active without disturbing them , keeping warm maybe ? I'm a bit of a techie and an electronics engineer so I have thought of installing some equipment to be able to log and listen in to the hive noise remotely. We'll see about this but maybe not this year.
    Many thanks for all comments.
    Regards
    -Jim

  2. #12
    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
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    There are electronic hive monitors available... Or you can buy a stethoscope from eBay for very little and play doctors and nurses with your girls!
    With the level of food your colony has; they are not going to drop dead just yet! The crunch time is in spring when the bees are working hard to keep the brood-nest at 35 degrees and rear brood with a small number of bees, and consuming food to give them the calories to do so. However a full National brood box is usually enough for a colony. And you have two boxes! (For my sins I am an electronic engineer too).
    I think we all worry about our bees - with experience you will be less-concerned.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam View Post
    There are electronic hive monitors available... Or you can buy a stethoscope from eBay for very little and play doctors and nurses with your girls!
    With the level of food your colony has; they are not going to drop dead just yet! The crunch time is in spring when the bees are working hard to keep the brood-nest at 35 degrees and rear brood with a small number of bees, and consuming food to give them the calories to do so. However a full National brood box is usually enough for a colony. And you have two boxes! (For my sins I am an electronic engineer too).
    I think we all worry about our bees - with experience you will be less-concerned.
    I have a stethoscope somewhere , will look it out , I have been just bending over and putting ear against the brood box. I suppose this could look quite strange to on-lookers but at least with stethoscope I will look like I'm just listening for woodworm!
    Regards
    Jim

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