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Thread: Senior scientific question equations???

  1. #11

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    Actually, I suggest that the powers that be throw another 250K at them. They need to do more experiments and include the results in their report. To borrow a phrase from there report ...the one that make me glaze over without going further 'if we assume...or assuming this'......that I use 70gsm paper in my printer, we need another 11 pages to solve the shoogly table paradox/conundrum/problem/catastrophe (that's the same one as the 'spilled drinks dilemma'). Worthwhile investment if you ask me.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calluna4u View Post
    Blimey Fatshark. That's one hell of a report with some serious practical applications. You were missing out not reading it all.

    Uses include.......1. The permanent treatment of insomnia. 2.The scientifically based solution to the 'shoogly table' problem. ....
    I have a shoogly table! So, now I'll just have to read the paper. That will be bed-time reading: one page per evening, and I'll also benefit from the number one application.
    Kitta

  3. #13
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calluna4u View Post
    Actually, I suggest that the powers that be throw another 250K at them. They need to do more experiments and include the results in their report. .......
    Well, they invoke the mythical honey bee decline in the abstract so that must surely be worth a doubling of their research budget to half a million tax dollars, no?!

    'Understanding the recent decline in honey bee colonies hinges on understanding the factors that impact each of these different age castes. '

    I wonder what proportion of the scientific literature on bees (or anything for that matter) these days is garbage. The quality seems to have declined over the years as people chase funds for topics they don't really understand, maximise their publication rate and make more and more outrageous claims for novelty.

    Hurrumph!

    I could also hurrumph about the whole beekeeping examination system and its preoccupation with simplistic (or even slightly complex) theoretical models as to why bees do certain things. Most of it is naive and some of it liable to lead to wrong-headed real beekeeping advice. Anyway, good luck on your quest, GG. You have my sympathies.

    There is good science out there on the longevity of workers. I had cause to look it up recently when arguing with a highly certificated beekeeper.

    These questions do provoke thought and discussion, which is a good thing.

  4. #14
    Senior Member fatshark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gavin View Post
    I wonder what proportion of the scientific literature on bees (or anything for that matter) these days is garbage. The quality seems to have declined over the years as people chase funds for topics they don't really understand, maximise their publication rate and make more and more outrageous claims for novelty.
    Where's there a moderator when you need one?



    PS You should see some of the stuff that doesn't get published or funded.

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    I am staggered by this nonsense. Who is setting this sort of stuff in SBA papers? Frankly I would expect that sort of thing on a PHD or Docterate forum discussing the more arcane aspects of beekeping. In my view and I hold an Expert ticket it is so far from reality it is totally out of place. This needs a review.

    PH

  6. #16
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatshark View Post
    Where's there a moderator when you need one?



    PS You should see some of the stuff that doesn't get published or funded.
    Yeah, poacher turned gamekeeper or some such phrase I guess .

    And I *have* seen quite a bit of the stuff that doesn't get funded or published! Just not (more than rarely) in the bee world.

    Pete, GG is in Ireland so this isn't an SBA exam as far as I know.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
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    Yes I am Irish and it was one of I think 100 questions that appeared on past papers. We also study Pest and diseases swarm management varroa, Internal structure of the bee etc... We meet every second week on line using Zoom. I was curious as to what the reaction here would be to the question as its mostly educational and you guys always refer to good links except the last one . I will have a look see if anything else curious turns up.
    The new IBA clg are having an online lecture in April. I am sure anyone can join in if you have zoom and register as I believe it can accommodate 200 people. Its on bee vision.
    You are all very welcome to a talk on Bee vision by Dara Kilmartin.

    Dara Kilmartin is a hobbyist beekeeper with 8years experience managing 20 colonies in 3apiaries, in suburban Dublin, rural Wexford andon a remote island in Connemara. He wasawarded the CFL qualification of FIBKA in 2016following exam lectures on Beestings and Bee Vision.He is the Bee Health Officer of the County DublinBeekeepers Association and is an active member of the Native IrishHoney Bee Society. He regularly gives pollen microscopy workshopsand bee dissection/disease analysis and has attended most NDB shortcourses.His day job is as a consultant eye surgeon and retinal specialist at theRoyal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital, Dublin, the largest eye unit inIreland. Following UCD medical graduation, he obtained a first classhonours Masters degree in Physiology and trained in ocularimmunology at the University of Aberdeen, UK. Particular beekeepinginterests include pollen nutrition effects on bee immunity andcomparative bee vision.

    Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/398213922

    Or iPhone one-tap :
    Ireland: +35316917488,,398213922#
    Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
    Ireland: +353 (0) 1 691 7488
    South Africa: +27 87 551 7702
    Meeting ID: 398 213 922
    International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/bmubTra8
    Last edited by Greengage; 15-04-2018 at 06:05 PM. Reason: Spelling I hope...

  8. #18
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    Thank goodness we have more sense then.

    PH

  9. #19
    Senior Member fatshark's Avatar
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    Here's a cool study ... https://www.frontiersin.org/articles...018.00035/full
    Tracking All Members of a Honey Bee Colony Over Their Lifetime Using Learned Models of Correspondence
    No bee-related results yet, it's methodological. They uniquely tagged >2700 bees in a one frame observation hive and photographed them at 3 Hz over ten weeks ... that's a total of something like 67 million frames. They can identify individual bees, and the tracks they follow, with an error rate of ~2%. Considering this accuracy, the lifespan of a worker and the duration of the study, they'll be able to identify every single interaction the bees had in the hive.
    Lots of fun to be had with this type of technology and properly understanding worker policing, egg selection for queen rearing and which workers are involved etc.

    They used a Cray supercomputer to do the calculations. Further details are available here: Automatic localization and decoding of honeybee markers using deep convolutional neural networks [PDF download]

    Disappointingly, there's only one equation in the latter paper

  10. #20
    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
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    A lot of the beekeepers who do well in the exams seem to be biology teachers or someone with that kind of background. It doesn't necessarily make them a good beekeeper it's just that they can answer the questions The mathsy question in the OP is really a test for mathematics skills rather than test for beekeeping skills so could be considered as somewhat obscure.

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