Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Dandelion pollen is of poor nutritional quality for honey bees?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    575
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Dandelion pollen is of poor nutritional quality for honey bees?

    Hi Anyone down load this citation that i could read, i could join and pretend i am a research student at a collage.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...nal_Evaluation

    It would appear from the bits I can access that pollen from dandelions are overrated as a source of protein for for honey bees. Dandelions appear to be missing some of the amino acids needed to manufacture protein. Some of this research seems to indicate that honey bees fed dandelion pollen alone have low success at raising brood or fail to raise any at all when fed pollen from dandelions alone.

  2. #2

    Default

    Willow and OSR are not too special either, one of the best is Gorse, which flowers pretty much all year round.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    575
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete L View Post
    Willow and OSR are not too special either, one of the best is Gorse, which flowers pretty much all year round.
    I thought i read somewhere that Pollen from Brassicas was pretty good do you have a link to that. This is one for dandelion pollen I found.
    https://academic.oup.com/jee/article...rectedFrom=PDF

  4. #4

    Default

    There are a lot of research papers about protien of various pollens, OSR is about average or slightly below at 23% gorse is above average at a little over 28%.
    Here is one article.
    http://www.nbba.ca/wp-content/upload...ed_Pollens.pdf

    There is a better one I have read, but don't have time to find it just now.

  5. #5

    Default

    I'll trust the bees to know what they like and what's good for them. They seem to love Dandelion and Willow.

  6. #6

    Default

    Even during a full flow on OSR some bees go hunting dandelion. I think a lot of these studies are too narrowly focussed and draw conclusions that are fine in the isolation of the theorists lab, but very different in the field.

    I believe they hunt a balanced diet...and say OSR pollen, whilst rich, does not give them everything they need so they look for mixed feeding. FWIW gorse seems to be one of the fastest to be abandoned when other forage becomes abundant. Despite there being plenty of it around many of our places we would say it was a medium importance pollen plant judging by how much they bring in of it. They don't read the books and do what they want.

  7. #7

    Default

    I don't know how good gorse is elsewhere, but here I class it as of major importance, especially during the winter and early spring, they collect an abundance of it and any colonies within easy reach of it are always the most advanced in spring, (usually make sure that is most of them for this reason)
    Last edited by Pete L; 09-04-2018 at 09:30 PM.

  8. #8

    Default

    IMG_8565[1].jpg

    This girl loves the Dandelion

  9. #9
    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Norfolk East Anglia, South Scotland
    Posts
    852

    Default

    I believe I read somewhere that high quantities of dandelion flower result in yellow comb being drawn? I often see them in verges at this time of year.
    In any case a variety of pollen plants has to be good. BBC radio 4 (Inside science?) was on yesterday and there was a piece about the lack of diversity in grass verges. The conclusion was to not cut them until September and then to remove the cut debris to allow seeds to fall through to germinate.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam View Post
    I believe I read somewhere that high quantities of dandelion flower result in yellow comb being drawn? I often see them in verges at this time of year.
    You’re right Adam, my strongest colonies are drawing plenty of yellow comb at the moment and my friend Sue has often noticed this with her bees too. There is an abundance of them out here this spring and the fields are full of them. The weather has been kinder than usual so the bees are making the most of them. Although our bees store dandelion honey most of it doesn’t end up in the supers which is fine because it has very strong flavours.https://www.natureword.com/propertie...ndelion-honey/
    The bit in the above link about mild diarrhoea is certainly true for some of our bees because it’s noticeable on the outside of our hives.
    The daffodils have been brilliant this year with long stems and the rooks are nesting high in what few trees we have, so according to the local sages we are in for a good summer. I do hope they’re right.
    Last edited by lindsay s; 20-05-2018 at 05:16 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •