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Thread: Separating wax from honey

  1. #11
    Senior Member Bridget's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mellifera Crofter View Post
    Yes, so do I, Bridget - but I think I've left it a bit too late this year - and I have a lot.

    Beautiful and intricate as it may be, I get a bit fed-up having to chisel their beautiful sculptures out of the feeders when I do give the cappings to the bees. The answer is, of course, that I should give it to them in old ice cream tubs, or whatever, rather than my rapid feeders! Next time ...

    Kitta
    Oh that answers our question Kitta. Couldn't work out why we are getting all this new comb in the rapid feeder. Of course, don't give them space to do that. Makes sense. Now I must remember to tell Fraser in the morning. LSNED
    (Just made that up! Learn something new every day - and this applies especially to Beekeepers!)



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  2. #12
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    Hi
    I keep my capping wax in a 12,5kg honey bucket I want to retire.
    When I am done uncapping, it goes in my trusty honey liquifier (in my case something like a 20l tea urn appliance).
    Bung the temperature to 70C and after 2-3 hours the honey is on the bottom and the melted wax on the top.
    Let it cool, and i have a nice block of wax and a nice pasturised honey for mead making.
    Some propolis from the cappings will always end up stuck to the walls, hence the retirement of the bucket.

    just seen the prices for Baby Bottler (Stainless Steel) and Economy Honey Press 300 pounds each.
    Wow what a ripoff those items are buyable for 100€ from non beekeeping websites....
    Last edited by Calum; 27-09-2017 at 01:12 PM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calum View Post
    ... When I am done uncapping, it goes in my trusty honey liquifier (in my case something like a 20l tea urn appliance).
    Bung the temperature to 70C and after 2-3 hours the honey is on the bottom and the melted wax on the top. ..
    My tea urn (bought for two jars of honey) has an exposed element at the bottom. So far, I've only used it to sterilise frames or melt lots of yukky wax - for both, the element is covered in water. What about your honey liquifier, C4U? Is the element also exposed, and if so does that mean the honey for your mead is slightly diluted with water?
    Kitta

  4. #14
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    Hi Kitta, i use a similar device as the "baby bottler" advertised in Thornes ripoff shop. The element is not exposed. But i do all the melting in a honey plastic bucket in a water bath in the urn. I have a heat stable plastic grate in my urn so the plastic bucket would not come into contact with the heated floor of the urn.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calum View Post
    ... But i do all the melting in a honey plastic bucket in a water bath in the urn. ...
    Thanks Calum, that's what I should try! I'll find a bucket that fits the urn and figure out a way that it's lifted from the element.
    Kitta

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