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Thread: putting new V queens in apideas

  1. #11
    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
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    I have previously not had much success with putting virgins into colonies. However this year I brought home 4 that I 'pulled' from a colony I had been asked to help out with. One was caged for 24 hours and released onto the top bars. One was dunked in syrup and dropped into wet bees in an upside down mini-nuc and turned over. The others were let out straight into nucs with a bit of smoke. (Very few older bees in the colonies and apart from the mini-nuc, had been waiting for a queen so definitely queenless. All queens came good.

  2. #12

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    Would you use a butler cage for this? I hatched three queens I had raised in a cupkit (disappointing yield as I had put in 21 cups with eggs). I ran the queens into a mini nuc with a generous cupful of syrup soaked bees and they all took and mated (yay)
    Will try again next year. Any thoughts about why only 3/21 eggs made it to queens? I used a Paynes polynuc as the host but it was stuffed with bees and stores. Is it to do with the size of the hive? Would I do better in a brood body? I used the polynuc because it was easier to look through and check there were no native queen cells that would hatch before my cup queens and murder them


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  3. #13
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    A Paynes nuc with an extra brood box full of bees would be better but of course that makes the searching for additional queen cells less easy (not so hard though!). The windy, showery, cool summer we're having is reducing the vigour of stocks and leading to poor takes when grafting. Only two set in one of my double Paynes this week and another 10 frame (and supered) queenless colony gave just 6 cells. Feeding before and after helps and a good supply of pollen near the grafts (or Candipolline over the top bars) (thanks Jeff!) makes a difference but the strike rate is still much lower than times when foraging was good.
    Last edited by gavin; 29-07-2017 at 03:56 PM.

  4. #14

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    Thanks Gavin that is both reassuring and helpful. I was doing more reading and think that I did not have enough nurse bees. Kate's excellent letter in this months magazine also made that point
    In Ullapool we had a really lovely April and May a very cool wet June and then a mainly warm sunny July (beekeeping makes you think about these things)
    I will try again next year and try in a brood body with lots of nurse bees. The pollen tip is a good one too. Anyway I was pleased with my three queens and now have my five colonies headed up by well laying 17 queens


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  5. #15

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    I hatched three queens I had raised in a cupkit (disappointing yield as I had put in 21 cups with eggs)


    RDMW once the lava hatch and transfer them from the cassette to the cell raising bar
    Leave the cassette where it is with all the other larva
    Check next day to see how many are accepted
    You can go back to the cassette and replace all the cell bar cups that failed
    All these larva will still be the same age
    You will then get more starts
    Last edited by The Drone Ranger; 01-08-2017 at 12:07 PM.

  6. #16

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    Ah that's interesting. I transferred them at the egg stage. Was that too early? Sorry to be stupid but how do I know when they are "accepted"


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  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by RDMW View Post
    Ah that's interesting. I transferred them at the egg stage. Was that too early? Sorry to be stupid but how do I know when they are "accepted"


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    too early RDMW you have to wait till the eggs have hatched
    looking in the back of the cassette you pick the ones with the most royal jelly
    use the white middle section of the cupkit system to pick up the brown cups
    That is easier than using fingers

    When you see eggs just take the white plug out of the front of the cassette
    it takes the queen a little while but she will find the way out
    Then wait till the eggs hatch before you go to the next stage of putting them on the cell bar
    One day later check the cell bar if there is a ring of wax round the cell cup AND the larva is still there with a good supply of royal jelly that means the bees are trying to raise a queen ie the larva has been accepted
    any empty ones replace them with other larva from the cassette as per previous post

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    Last edited by The Drone Ranger; 02-08-2017 at 11:06 PM.

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