Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: stupna košnica dk i rad sa njom Whatever that means

  1. #1
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    469
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default stupna košnica dk i rad sa njom Whatever that means

    I would like to know more about what he is at, I think this is beekeeping from Slovenia.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wat7Rmu0czw

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, on top of a wind-swept and exposed hill.
    Posts
    977

    Default

    I found - this document - about the AZ hive on the SBA website. It's filed under Learn / Bee Basics / AZ Hive.

    Kitta

  3. #3
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    469
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Thanks for that very informative.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Scottish Borders
    Posts
    319

    Default

    Funnily enough I found a video yesterday from of course the States claiming this concept as a brand new idea for Langstroths. Just goes to show in beekeeping there is pretty much nothing new.

    PH

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, on top of a wind-swept and exposed hill.
    Posts
    977

    Default

    I think I saw that video, PH.

    There were lots of hives dating from the 19th century with doors.

    Here is a link to the Prokopovich hive. Click on 'The world's first frame hive'. (Amazingly, the writer of the article does not seem to understand that it's not moveable frames that's attributed to Langstroth, but understanding and defining the bee space.)

    Below is an image I copied from my Eva Crane book (the book was a present) of various hives with doors, and two pictures I copied from Encyclopedie Universelle: the Propokovich hive and Munn's hive with moveable frames (except they got propolised to the bottom of the hive - so not so moveable).

    (I'm trying to get to grips with the history of hive design for module 8!)

    IMG_20170213_0001.jpg prokopovich-ruche-1807-pm.jpg munn-ruche-gravure.jpg

  6. #6
    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Norfolk East Anglia, South Scotland
    Posts
    746

    Default

    Makes me think of the filing cabinet by my desk at work - but perhaps a bit more interesting.
    He up ended the bottom slider of frames. Why?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, on top of a wind-swept and exposed hill.
    Posts
    977

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam View Post
    ... He up ended the bottom slider of frames. Why?
    Yes - I didn't notice that before. I have no idea why he did that (the chap in GG's video). Also, the hive he is using isn't quite an AZ hive either because he removes a whole canister of combs, whereas in the AZ the combs are removed individually.

    Kitta

  8. #8
    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Jurassic Coast.
    Posts
    1,444

    Default

    Don't get much chance for internetting these days but as I'm here.... I'd speculate that the upending of the frames is a demonstration of how you can manipulate the bees into drawing the comb in the lower box fully down to the bottom bars, this was a feature of the danzenbaker hive, we've experimented with the idea in some home produced, deep frame, mating nucs and can attest that the principle does work.


    There was even a special reversible frame made in 19th century America, the 'Van Deusen Reversible frame':

    there's some correspondence in, Gleanings in BeeCulture, June 1889

    https://archive.org/stream/CAT939762...2up/search/van

    More recently Wyatt Mangum wrote an excellent article on the subject in the ABJ, May 2010, but unfortunately I don't hve a web link.

    Or, there may be a totally different reason for the manipulation as shown in the video!
    Last edited by prakel; 13-02-2017 at 10:40 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, on top of a wind-swept and exposed hill.
    Posts
    977

    Default

    That's interesting - thanks, Prakel. When you've reversed the comb, do the bees continue to draw out the cells in the original direction - drawing out cells that point down?

    (I think I used a wrong word above by talking about a 'canister' of combs. I was probably thinking about a 'cassette' of combs - but that might not be a good word either.)

    Kitta

  10. #10
    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Jurassic Coast.
    Posts
    1,444

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mellifera Crofter View Post
    That's interesting - thanks, Prakel. When you've reversed the comb, do the bees continue to draw out the cells in the original direction - drawing out cells that point down?
    Hi Kitta, no, they tend to build in the correct orientation with transitionary cells between, however this is of little importance when using foundationless and/or unwired combs; it's more important to get the frames filled with comb, remembering that the reveral isn't permanent.

    Another thought which has come to mind overnight is that he may simply have been demonstrating how you can move the honey arc out of the queen's way to encourage upward movement of the brood nest -another aspect of the reversable frame.

    -------

    If you watch 'More than Honey' the Singer's (Austrian queen producers) appear to use a poly mating nuc with lugless frames which, I'd imagine could be reversable if the operator so wished, but the clip is very brief so this is even more speculation!

    I'll now be awol again with no guarantee of internet access, but may return to this thread at a later date
    Last edited by prakel; 14-02-2017 at 09:25 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •