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Thread: Drone genetics.

  1. #61
    Senior Member fatshark's Avatar
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    That's an easy thing to test ... a few hundred RFID-chipped workers and an array of hives with readers/detectors across their entrances. It would only cost a couple of hundred thousand quid. Alternatively, a couple of POSCA pens and some willing project students willing to watch hive entrances for a few days. That would only cost 10.40

    I think the recent data from Seeley indicates that something like 20-30% of drones are found in hives other than the one they were raised in ...

  2. #62
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
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    In this study it showed that drones drifted more freely than workers,
    https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00891701/document
    they used DNA Microsatellite maternity testing whatever that is as they reckoned labeling tecniquues interfered with bee behaviour. http://www.apidologie.org/articles/a..._6_ART0005.pdf
    I think ill just mark a few from one hive and tell my neighbours to keep a look out for them just to see what happens.

  3. #63
    Senior Member fatshark's Avatar
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    Microsatellite maternity testing enables the mother of the worker/drone to be determined ... by working out the range present in the hive it tells you how many mothers (queens) they originated from. This wouldn't necessarily help with supporting/refuting the interesting suggestion made by prakel ... for that you'd need to determine, over time, where the bees were and whether they start and end in the hive but go somewhere in between times.

  4. #64
    Senior Member busybeephilip's Avatar
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    QUOTE<<I think ill just mark a few from one hive and tell my neighbours to keep a look out for them just to see what happens.>>


    Greengage - I recall reading somewhere that drones can drift some considerable distance and not just within an apairy like in the region of 10+ km. Nest season I think I'll try marking drones to see if any turn up in my outapairies

  5. #65
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
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    I saw this abstract form a 1958 journal https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...09A6F2BD99DF2F
    Most of the bees which drift do so during their orientation flights and before they become regular foragers.

    2. Bees emerging in August and September drift less than those emerging earlier in the year.

    3. Drifting varies considerably in different circumstances, and may be extensive.

    4. Drones drift two to three times as frequently as workers.

    5. An individual bee is more likely to drift from a small to a large colony than vice versa, but the greater number of bees flying from the large colonies may result in a net gain in bees by the smaller ones.

    6. When hives are arranged in repetitive patterns, bees drift to hives occupying similar positions in the pattern to their own. When hives are arranged in rows, bees from the centre colonies drift more than those at the end, resulting in the latter colonies gaining numerically. In some circumstances, more bees drift to hives in one direction than in the opposite direction.

    7. Facing hives in different directions and painting them different colours considerably reduces drifting, the facing of hives in different directions being of the greater significance.
    But dont drifting bees also transport pests and diseases. Maybe I should start a new thread on drifting bees.

  6. #66

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    Quick test
    Catch and mark 10 workers returning or flying from hive A
    put them in hive B in the evening

    Catch and mark 10 drones returning or flying from hive A
    Put them in hive B in the evening

    Late next day check how many are left in hive B

    My guess is all the drones none of the workers


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  7. #67
    Senior Member Greengage's Avatar
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    Ill let you know hope I remember this.

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