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Thread: The Biology of Mating by Juliana Rangel (NHS lecture).

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    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
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    Default The Biology of Mating by Juliana Rangel (NHS lecture).

    Anothe great video lecture from the National Honey Show, this time it's 'The Biology of Mating' by Juliana Rangel.

    https://youtu.be/tLHcle6CKcg

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    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
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    A good reference which touches on many points which are regularly discussed on this forum.

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    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prakel View Post
    A good reference which touches on many points which are regularly discussed on this forum.
    Yes, a nice presentation. One topic we've discussed which she touched on was the conditions for mating flights. I was a little surprised to see her view on the environmental conditions for mating flights:

    - temp >75F (ie 23.9C)
    - sunny or partially blue sky
    - little wind (<10mph)

    Maybe these American bees are spoiled.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gavin View Post
    Yes, a nice presentation. One topic we've discussed which she touched on was the conditions for mating flights. I was a little surprised to see her view on the environmental conditions for mating flights:

    - temp >75F (ie 23.9C)
    - sunny or partially blue sky
    - little wind (<10mph)

    Maybe these American bees are spoiled.
    I would never have mated any queens this year with those temperature limits...

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    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
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    I wonder whether the screen shot should actually have said 65f rather than 75?

    edit: This paper discusses temperature too:

    Observation of the Mating Behavior of Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.) Queens Using Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID): Factors Influencing the Duration and Frequency of Nuptial Flights

    http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4450/5/3/513/pdf
    Last edited by prakel; 22-11-2015 at 09:39 AM.

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    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prakel View Post
    I wonder whether the screen shot should actually have said 65f rather than 75?
    Could be. Every link you post is interesting and relevant. However this one (to the Heidinger paper) is fantastic, thanks.

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    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    Occasionally, queens do not enter their mating nuc immediately after returning, but instead cluster together with worker bees in front of the entrance (own observation).
    Interesting that clustering behaviour was noted after mating flights. This chimes with with the clustering I see which I think is related to mating flights or AvM.
    This paper was looking at Carnica queen mating flights as opposed to Amm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon View Post
    Interesting that clustering behaviour was noted after mating flights. This chimes with with the clustering I see which I think is related to mating flights or AvM.
    This paper was looking at Carnica queen mating flights as opposed to Amm.
    I thought Julianna Rangel said queens mate with 15+ drones not from the home apiary
    have I watched the wrong lecture ?

    Apologies Jon you mean the article linked to and the passage
    "Nuptial flights of
    more than one hour duration also appear unlikely [23]. Occasionally, queens do not enter their mating
    nuc immediately after returning, but instead cluster together with worker bees in front of the entrance"

    That doesn't mention AVM though ?
    Last edited by The Drone Ranger; 22-11-2015 at 10:03 PM.

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    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    hi. The quote was from the paper Prakel posted.
    I haven't watched to the end of the lecture yet!

    The clustering observation is interesting whether the mating takes pace locally or in a DCA

    http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4450/5/3/513/pdf

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon View Post
    hi. The quote was from the paper Prakel posted.
    I haven't watched to the end of the lecture yet!

    The clustering observation is interesting whether the mating takes pace locally or in a DCA

    http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4450/5/3/513/pdf
    Hi Jon crossed post while I was correcting my earlier mistake
    I didn't think it was concerning AVM just clustering after a mating flight to a normal DCA

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