Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 109

Thread: Hi there everyone

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Hi there everyone

    Hi everyone,
    been on here for a bit now and just been reading through the post's until I got my bees, which I have now got three hives

    No:1 Full hive bought from a local beekeeper.
    No:2 Swarm been installed about one week now and no signs of eggs.
    No:3 Nuke bought from again a local breeder.

    Just so excited to be finally able to see my bees flying in and out of the hive, I have decided to film every time I go into a hive to check on them as I can refer back to the video later and then sopt things that I have missed.

    Regards
    Graham

  2. #2
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tayside
    Posts
    4,399
    Blog Entries
    41

    Default

    I can more or less remember the excitement myself - around 20 years ago. It was a good decision then and remains so now. Hope it works out as well for you. Let us know how you get on.

    Gavin

  3. #3
    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Norfolk East Anglia, South Scotland
    Posts
    764

    Default

    One thing that always pleases me is when a queen starts to lay. Hopefully yours will soon.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gavin View Post
    I can more or less remember the excitement myself - around 20 years ago. It was a good decision then and remains so now. Hope it works out as well for you. Let us know how you get on.

    Gavin
    Adam
    One thing that always pleases me is when a queen starts to lay. Hopefully yours will soon.
    Hi Gavin & Adam, thanks for the comment. Wish now I had started 20 years ago now here are a few videos of what has been happening to the 2 hives that I am working on just now!

    Yes I hope the queen in the swarm hive starts laying soon and also shows herself

    Any comment welcome:

    Swarm hive 1st inspection


    Hive one 1st real inspection 6-7-14


    Found supercedure cells in this hive today, took them down will check again in a few days. Does this mean I will have to split this hive do a artificial swarm??

    I think that videoing what I am doing is a great help as I can watch it back again & again and notice stuff that I didn't when I was doing the inspection.
    Hope you enjoy the videos
    Last edited by gwizzie; 06-07-2015 at 07:44 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    Hi giwizzie,

    Very interesting to see someone else doing an inspection and brave to post it for comments.

    A couple of tips which hopefully will be of use from watching the videos:

    I noticed on the second video that you lifted the crown board without removing the empty super/ roof first. When it slipped back down it gave them an all mighty bang which probably agitated them a bit. I would have broken down it into more manageable and sections before removing the crown board. I was also puzzled by you putting the QE on crown board and then an empty super. I could not see a reason for it!

    On a side note you might want to check the gap in the side of the second hive, it looks a bit big. You'll see what I mean if you review the end as you close up. You also went and killed the QCs as soon as you saw them. I personally have waited for a bit more info from the inspection just in case they were requeening due to a sudden queen loss. If they were you could have stopped that process.

    In the both videos I reckoned you had 12 frames in the body. If this is correct, have you considered going to 11 and using a dummy board? Gives IMO an easier time when removing the first few frames.

    Out of interest why did you treat the first hive? Was there evidence of high mite levels?

    I would try to get into the habit of neat working round the hive. You'll soon find the flow that you are comfortable with which will make life easier.

    Good luck, I'm no expert but but these are my comments on your very brave post. I hope they are of use.

  6. #6

    Default

    Hi Thanks for your comments, this is the reason that I posted it to get feedback from members. I will try and answer some of your replies the best I can!!!

    I noticed on the second video that you lifted the crown board without removing the empty super/ roof first. When it slipped back down it gave them an all mighty bang which probably agitated them a bit. I would have broken down it into more manageable and sections before removing the crown board.
    You are correct it would have been easier and it is what I normally do but the weather was so changeable that day (newbie mistake)

    I was also puzzled by you putting the QE on crown board and then an empty super. I could not see a reason for it!
    I placed the crown board back on top of the QE because I had intended to add frames to the super and was going to remove it then... as didn't want the super filling up with bees before I had put in the frames.

    In the both videos I reckoned you had 12 frames in the body. If this is correct, have you considered going to 11 and using a dummy board? Gives IMO an easier time when removing the first few frames.
    At the moment that is what I use and other members around here 12 frames! I have in my new poly hive 11 frames and a dummy board in it as you can't get 12 into it.

    Out of interest why did you treat the first hive? Was there evidence of high mite levels?
    This swarm came from a colony that had survived the winter in someone's roof (not from someone's hive) therefor they had not been treated for varroa and I was advised to treat them ASAP before brood had started to appear.

    I would try to get into the habit of neat working round the hive.
    I do so a bit confused over this comment???

    but again thanks for your comments

    regards
    Graham
    Last edited by gwizzie; 07-07-2015 at 11:44 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Graham,

    Sorry should have been clearer about neat working. What I mean is when you arrive at the hive have everything you are likely to need at your hands. I remove my roof and put it behind me to my right every time. I then follow the same removal process for each item. It builds habit which should make things easier as you do it more. You also know exactly where everything is when you need it.

    There is a phrase from the yanks, 'slow is smooth, smooth is fast'. If you are comfortable with everything at your hands you will move smoothly and increase your speed. I also run a checklist through my head before I start so I know what I want to do in the hive before I start. I usually have a list of what if scenario's in case I encounter something unexpected. This has included, stop, close the hive walk away and think about it.

    Thanks for the reply. If I had a tripod for a camera I would video mine so I could be critiqued!

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alclosier View Post
    Graham,

    Sorry should have been clearer about neat working. What I mean is when you arrive at the hive have everything you are likely to need at your hands. I remove my roof and put it behind me to my right every time. I then follow the same removal process for each item. It builds habit which should make things easier as you do it more. You also know exactly where everything is when you need it.

    There is a phrase from the yanks, 'slow is smooth, smooth is fast'. If you are comfortable with everything at your hands you will move smoothly and increase your speed. I also run a checklist through my head before I start so I know what I want to do in the hive before I start. I usually have a list of what if scenario's in case I encounter something unexpected. This has included, stop, close the hive walk away and think about it.

    Thanks for the reply. If I had a tripod for a camera I would video mine so I could be critiqued!
    Again thanks for the tips, I will try and get into some kind of routine so I can be more efficient. As for the tripod go out and get one there not that expensive and dont worry about being critiqued IM not thats how you learn.

    As I used to say to people when I ran several forums There are never stupid questions only stupid answers life is one big learning curve for us all everyday and if you never ask you will never learn or know anything!!
    regards
    Graham

  9. #9

    Default

    Graham Thornes sell a blue metal thing for hanging a frame on outside the hive
    I have found that handy
    http://www.thorne.co.uk/hardware-clo...roduct_id=1783
    They were 5.00 in the sale last year or one before

  10. #10
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tayside
    Posts
    4,399
    Blog Entries
    41

    Default

    Hi Graham

    Yes, brave putting up videos of beekeeping so early in your career! One of mine would show lots of things folk would pick up on. One last night would have been entertaining as I when I opened a double brood hive it erupted into thousands of angry bees zig-zag flying at chest height in a radius of about 15 ft around the hive. I retreated into the trees and then there were only 20 or 30 trying to kill me through my veil. I had to leave them to settle for 20 min before I could face going back to retrieve the smoker. That one has been getting worse and worse. I managed a quick peek at the queen cups along the join between the boxes thanks to a dense cloud of wood smoke but then had to retreat again. It has joined its neighbour in the 'unmanageable' category.

    Anyway, two things. Once you prise open a hive more than a bee space try not to let the gap close again. Some use wooden wedges, I just hold the equipment apart. The crunchy sound is never pleasant, though in your case you may have managed to keep bees out of the gap with smoke.

    Just wanted to amplify Al C's comments on queens. Once you see queen cells (I doubt that they're supersedure cells) you need to switch over to detective mode before doing anything removing them. Is the queen still there? Are there eggs? Nowadays my first move is to find the queen, move her into a nuc on her frame plus a frame of stores, making sure that there are enough bees with her. Then I leave them alone until a couple of days before the first queen is due to emerge. Alternatively you can do a classic artificial swarm. To find the queen you have to take your time, starting looking all round the edges of each frame and working in. I use the back of my hand or a hive tool to gently touch thicker layers of bees to make sure I'm seeing every bee. You did some of that but not enough to check thoroughly. Also look on the walls and floors as you go (and the underside of the queen excluder when you take it off).

    If any of those cells were sealed you might have lost a swarm already. As Al said you could have lost the queen (perhaps damaged on the last inspection) and if so then removing all the cells renders them hopelessly queenless. If there are eggs or young larvae the bees can recover from the loss of queen cells by making more, but if they have moved on from that point there are no young larvae to use so the colony cannot replace their queen.

    It looked like they were open queen cells. Assuming the queen is there you need to do an artificial swarm. If you managed to remove all part-developed queen cells leaving only perhaps larvae less than a day old then you may have a few days (perhaps 4), unless they make emergency cells from older worker larvae. Removing the cells doesn't solve anything and risks a swarm earlier in the process before queen cells are sealed. If you missed one you may have only a day or two. In other words it has become urgent to find the queen and do an artificial swarm. All weather dependent of course, that may delay them swarming.

    hope that helps

    Gavin

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •