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Thread: Microscopy

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    I agree with Pete

  3. #13
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    Pollen looks like Crocus which can vary from 60 to over 100 micron - Characteristics : round, large, no visible apertures, granular surface, thin exine (& spring)
    Hazel is the "marker" pollen - shaped like the rotor of a Wankel engine (triangular with curved convex sides) and 25micron (a Wankel rotor has a constant diameter when measured through the centroid - as far as I know Herr Wankel did not keep bees but I may be wrong).
    Alan

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    Senior Member HJBee's Avatar
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    A few correct answers here!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kate Atchley View Post
    A clue perhaps ... I think the pollen's the one that can be used as a base measure?
    I haven't the faintest clue about pollen, mainly because I'm too tight fisted to buy an identification book at the full price and don't have easy access to a microscope, but I'm fairly sure I heard (or read somewhere) not long ago that British honey always contains Forget Me Not pollen. If true, interesting, if not then totally irrelevant.

  6. #16
    Senior Member HJBee's Avatar
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    Pollen was Crocus & Disease was Acarine & bee part was sting and associated parts.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Kate Atchley's Avatar
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    Having been on the course too was pointed to this sight with some useful anatomy pics: http://www.understandingbeeanatomy.com.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Kate Atchley's Avatar
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    On the case for pollen ... can anyone identify the brown twigs with little brown catkins, now opening to show yellow pollen. It grows low and plentiful at the boggy end of my garden and I think my be Eared Willow?
    IMG_0124.jpg
    The pics too small ... ugh?

  9. #19
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    The software shrinks images if uploaded. If you park them on a photosharing site then link to them from here they will be displayed at that size. The one below is on wildflowerfinder.co.uk.

    Could be if it has willow-like catkins. I take it isn't bog myrtle?


  10. #20
    Senior Member Kate Atchley's Avatar
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    So if I add a non-public page to my website, I could upload pics there and they could be shown in all their glory here?
    I don't remember bog myrtle in that spot but could be. It's the sort of site they like.

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