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Thread: R.I.P. The 1lb round.

  1. #1
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    Default R.I.P. The 1lb round.

    Iím going to have to order more honey jars soon and yes I might be counting my chickens before they hatch, but they will easily keep for a few years (the jars not the chickens). Iíve posted before that I was happy to use 1lb or 500g jars but times are changing. Visit any supermarket and you will find the 340g/12oz jar is now the standard and you might find value honey in 1lb jars. If you visit any deli or tourist shop youíll find 1lb honey jars quite rare. The price asked for good quality local honey is now so high I think nobody will dare to sell it in 1lb rounds. Iím thinking of switching to the 12oz Hex even though the jars are expensive. Another downside of smaller jars will be all the moaning from my customers that their being ripped off. By the way Iím not being greedy because Iíve already spent this yearís anticipated profit on more equipment. Unless you lot think different Rest In Peace the 1lb round.
    Last edited by lindsay s; 15-05-2014 at 11:44 PM.

  2. #2

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    You may be onto something lindsay, there was a good article in beecraft last September (I think) the premise of which was that generally beekeepers aren't great at marketing honey. The author argued that local honey is an artisan product and we should market and charge as such. My beekeeping colleague and I are working on our own labelling to this effect in an attempt to reflect the premium nature of local honey. As yet we haven't given any consideration to jar shape or size but maybe we should start thinking about it

    Steven

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  3. #3
    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
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    I'd not want to give up the 1lb's simply because they do make us stand out against a backdrop of 12oz jars.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by prakel View Post
    I'd not want to give up the 1lb's simply because they do make us stand out against a backdrop of 12oz jars.
    I suppose that's the other angle quality and value compared to the supermarkets generic products

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    Quote Originally Posted by prakel View Post
    I'd not want to give up the 1lb's simply because they do make us stand out against a backdrop of 12oz jars.
    Aye, me too. Also, my honey is nutritious food for local families, not some twee gifty shite for well heeled tourists.

  6. #6

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    I've gone down to half pound hex. Still sell out.

  7. #7

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    I'm with you Black Comb! Luckily for me I don't have to do any honey marketing. My OH Lucy just sells it through clubs she's in and through her Facebook friends. Our honey is pretty widely travelled! But 8oz or 12 oz is great - you can sell less for more money and people are starting to get the idea that our honey is a premium product. No offence to those of you that do get it but none of our honey is OSR - mixed blossom (mainly clover) first and then heather.

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    Quote Originally Posted by drumgerry View Post
    8oz or 12 oz is great - you can sell less for more money and people are starting to get the idea that our honey is a premium product.
    I go to a couple of farmers markets where there are honey stalls. None of them sell 1lb jars any more, but the prices for 12oz seem to be about the same as 1lb.

    I seem to get more takers for 12oz jars than any other, but try to keep some in 1lb jars for honey shows.

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    We've always sold ours in 8oz hex jars and minis. The minis are good for visiting cyclists who just want a reminder of the breakfast honey; we have no trouble selling 8oz jars to both locals and visitors.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbc View Post
    Also, my honey is nutritious food for local families, not some twee gifty shite for well heeled tourists.
    I totally agree with you mbc. A fair bit of my honey is given away and I sell as much as I can door to door. But I get paid a lot more money from the shop I supply to than I get from selling it door to door. A local deli is selling Scottish blended honey in 8oz hex jars for £4.15; a price I think is far too high. If anyone has the magic formula for quantity, quality and value please let me know.

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