Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 73

Thread: All fur coat and no knickers ...

  1. #11
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Belfast, N. Ireland
    Posts
    5,107
    Blog Entries
    94

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRIZZLY View Post
    What's wrong with Colonsay genetics ? - lack of availability perhaps.
    The trouble with Colonsay bees or the West Donegal bees I mentioned is that they will have zero adaptation to varroa as they are from mite free areas.
    The arrival of mites likely gets rid of the most susceptible stock quite quickly.
    I am curious to see what they have in Donegal.
    The Galtee breeding group have been doing some work on selecting for more resistant stock for several years now so may be some way down the road in terms of bees which can deal with mites.
    Last edited by Jon; 10-04-2014 at 10:14 PM.

  2. #12

    Default

    Or you might just find that they have some super-VSH gene that hasnt been tapped into yet
    ___________________________________
    brothermoo.wordpress.com

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    I can see Scotland from my apiary
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brothermoo View Post
    Or you might just find that they have some super-VSH gene that hasnt been tapped into yet
    ___________________________________
    brothermoo.wordpress.com
    I like that wishful thinkin' Moo, don't build your hope up though.

  4. #14
    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Jurassic Coast.
    Posts
    1,454

    Default

    Not quite sure where I'm trying to go with this (and don't want to derail Little John's thread too far). It's probably one for our band of talented geneticists:

    How much (or little) isolation is needed for a true local type to develop in the kind of sustainable manner that allows it to survive over hundreds of years? This might not be too easy a question to answer what with the vagaries of drone-drift but I find the idea of these local ecotypes quite fascinating in the light of what we now know of the effects of inbreeding.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    West Wales, Gorllewin Cymru
    Posts
    688

    Default

    I think in a hypothetical stable situation very little isolation is needed, a bit like local dialects which blur at the edges.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Nr Stranraer
    Posts
    668

    Default

    I would still bring in colonsay or galtee queens to add to the gene pool in my apiary as my stock is quite isolated with reguard to other bee colonies non of which is amm .

  7. #17
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Belfast, N. Ireland
    Posts
    5,107
    Blog Entries
    94

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brothermoo View Post
    Or you might just find that they have some super-VSH gene that hasnt been tapped into yet
    ___________________________________
    brothermoo.wordpress.com
    In that case the Nihbs reps for Ulster will be retiring to a life of luxury on the back of the fortune to be made!
    Must contact Branson to see if I can buy that Caribbean island from him.

    Necker Island - the new black bee sanctuary.
    Carried from colony to colony in a sedan chair as some minion checks frame by frame for queen cells.

  8. #18

    Default

    A willing minion here to get bronzed lol

    ___________________________________
    brothermoo.wordpress.com

  9. #19

    Default

    Whats the definition of pure stock?

    Morphometry only defines visable characteristics so you could have black bees that are in fact have a high % of Italian genetics even with Amm mitochondrial DNA the genetics could be mainly Italian or something else

    From what I see is happening here is that the black bee has been selected haphazardly on the basis of morphometry and some mt DNA studies. Also, there is no apparent breeding plan where tried and tested lines can be evaluated, just a concentration on the aspect of queen rearing from a range of basically untested queens followed by open mating, these being used again untested for the next and subsequent generations which any beekeeper reading a book can do. This is simply bad science !

    Simple question - How far back can "pure" Amm black stock be traced and why are breeding records not publicly available for scrutiny ?

  10. #20
    Senior Member prakel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Jurassic Coast.
    Posts
    1,454

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Top bee View Post
    ...and why are breeding records not publicly available for scrutiny ?
    Why should they be?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •