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Thread: KTBH mesh floor

  1. #1
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    Default KTBH mesh floor

    Hi guys, I've gone for a KTBH and it has a mesh floor. Does anyone cover/block their mesh floor in winter to stop cold wind from getting in or do you not bother?

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    I don't bother on my box hives and friends I know who use tbh tend not to bother even if they've built an insert or hinge on the bottom.

    With the combs drawn I think the air movement is reasonably minimal. I know a few people who monitor temperature within Hives and it is remarkably stable, even post inspection, regardless of the hive type.

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    Ok, thank you, Neils. I'll monitor how it goes at the time.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neils View Post
    ... With the combs drawn I think the air movement is reasonably minimal. I know a few people who monitor temperature within Hives and it is remarkably stable ...
    That's interesting - makes me feel slightly less worried about the effect of the wind on my hives. But still, Nui, I keep my varroa boards in, although I've drilled a few holes in them (like Neil - box hives).

    I'm busy making a TBH and was going to use a mesh floor, then realised I haven't considered how to make the varroa insert and close the hive when necessary - so I've changed my mind. I'm now going to use a hinged solid floor with a few holes in it (covered with mesh) for ventilation. I'm scared of the wind blowing into my hives.

  5. #5
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    My problem is that I'm 360 feet up with nothing between me and the north pole so, like you, wind can be a real problem especially at the start of this past winter when we had gusts of around 80 mph in rapid succession - doesn't matter where your hives are in those winds. Thankfully they're not frequently of that scale but this year was the exception early on in the winter.

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    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Are you sure that a KTBH is the way to go in your environment? The failure rate for beginners in better insulated, more easily managed hives is high enough already. I have to say however that I'm assuming your site is even worse than Mellifera Crofter's - things might be different if you were on some soft southern hill rather than looking out across the wild seas from a hill near Thurso or on the Isle of Lewis (not that Lewis has hills, they all blew down ages ago).

    If you are sure I gather Drumgerry in Speyside had some going spare if you are near him, but when I last heard of them he was planning converting them to troughs for alpines, self-disposing barbeques and other items of garden furniture!
    Last edited by gavin; 08-04-2014 at 09:24 AM.

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    It should be fine for me because weather like that isn't normal - yet. Usually it's not that cold or stormy and where my hive is is normally quiet and only really bothered by westerly winds that are usually warm.

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    Administrator gavin's Avatar
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    Ah, did wonder - hence the edit above.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by gavin View Post
    self-disposing barbeques and other items of garden furniture!
    Excellent

    Sent from my C5303 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Senior Member chris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neils View Post
    With the combs drawn I think the air movement is reasonably minimal. .
    From my observation of drawn comb, without foundation, the cells at the bottom are angled slightly downwards and this probably acts as a buffer against incoming wind.

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