Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 41

Thread: SG consultation on an Amm reserve on Colonsay

  1. #1
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tayside
    Posts
    4,417
    Blog Entries
    41

    Default SG consultation on an Amm reserve on Colonsay

    The Scottish Government issued a consultation on a possible reserve for native honeybees on Colonsay back in February. The consultation went to the SBA, the BFA, various nature conservation organisations, and at least some local beekeeping associations in Scotland.

    The consultation closes on 12 April, so if your local association hasn't yet responded you may like to have some discussion on this locally.

    The document issued with the consultation email is here, and the email text is below.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 2:04 PM
    Subject: Scottish Government proposal for an Apis mellifera mellifera reserve on Colonsay

    Good afternoon

    The Scottish Government is proposing to create a reserve for Apis mellifera mellifera (Black bee) on Colonsay.

    This issue was discussed during the passage of the Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) 2011 Act and the Minister for Environment and Climate Change stated that the protection of the Colonsay bees would be considered as a matter of priority following the coming into force of that legislation.

    We are now seeking views on the proposal. The process and deadline for submitting your views in included in the paper.

    Regards

    ---

    [responsible official]
    Wildlife and Protected Areas | Natural Resources Division | Directorate for Environment and Forestry
    The Scottish Government | 1-D North | Victoria Quay | Edinburgh | EH6 6QQ | T: 0131 244 6544
    www.scotland.gov.uk/nonnativespecies

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Lindau Germany
    Posts
    704
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    Hi
    an excellent idea, I'd add Varroa free: -reserve for varroa free Apis mellifera mellifera (Black bee) on Colonsay.
    Is colonsay large enough to support a population with enough DNA diversity? Or would it have to rely on 'imports' to preven inbreeding?
    Where do you sign your support- or only responses to the questionnare are accepted?
    Br
    Calum

  3. #3

    Default

    http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/arc...hp/t-3383.html
    This thread has lots of for and against arguments
    I can't see any reason why not but there are some folks who want all the sycamore trees chopped down because they are non native species so I doubt the outcome will be as straightforward as it could be here's a link to the USA about woodland http://www.prospectpark.org/environment/woodlands

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Lindau Germany
    Posts
    704
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    My 2 Cents, maybe it will give others additional ideas for grounds for the proposal:
    a) Do you agree that the Amm population on Colonsay should be protected?
    Yes all native stock that is disease free and varroa free should be protected as a matter of urgency and security for certain food production (in case of bee stock decimation on the mainland)
    c) Do you think that the proposal goes far enough/too far?
    I think that the proposal is appropriate but overlooks ‘varroa free’ potential of the current populations
    d) Should the proposal go further? For example by restricting the sale or advertising for sale of honey bees on Colonsay or requiring the reporting of non-Amm honey bees if they are seen on Colonsay.
    Reporting of non Amm bees might not be practical as most people have difficulty telling the difference. It would be well worth considering addressing the risk of feeding bees honey not from Colonsay – honey can contain foulbrood spores, and outbreak of which could decimate the population. This should be extended to used bee equipment (tools, boxes, frames, and brooded built up foundation.
    e) Do you think that the proposal would affect businesses? Yes, positively.
    If so – what types of business and what effect would you envisage?
    There is demand for purebred AMM bees throughout Europe; Colonsay could become a leading exporter to this market if queen breeders were active in this. Pricesfor AMM Queens range from 30-75 Pounds
    f) Do you think that the proposal would affect individuals? Yes (beekeepers positively, otherwise no)
    If so – what types of people and what effect would you envisage?
    Beekeepers on the island could profit from the designation when selling their queens or nucs, also beekeepers and the farmers that rely on their bees throughout UK and further afield could profit from this isolated purebred, disease free population in case of a die out such as the Isle of Wight Disease (Acarine (Tracheal) mites) 1904.

  5. #5

    Default

    Calum
    Would it not run contrary to the Scottish Beekeeping Association policy if Colonsay was shipping bees to the mainland ?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Lindau Germany
    Posts
    704
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    Hi
    I didn't know they had a policy re not exporting their superior AMM DNA.
    Isn't Colonsay devolving from Scotland with the rest of the Isles once Scotland has devolved from its better senses?

  7. #7
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tayside
    Posts
    4,417
    Blog Entries
    41

    Default

    Best keep off the politics. We all think differently, and that is OK.

    The point of this thread was to act as a reminder (or a first note) for local associations to contribute to the consultation. The more the merrier as far as I'm concerned! OK, this isn't the whole package, but at least it would be a start.

  8. #8
    Senior Member fatshark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Finest Fife
    Posts
    1,533

    Default

    Interestingly ... you'll note under section 4 that the release of "any animal outwith its native range in Scotland is an offence". This of course means that the release of Varroa on Colonsay would be an offence ...

  9. #9
    Administrator gavin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tayside
    Posts
    4,417
    Blog Entries
    41

    Default SG consultation on an Amm reserve on Colonsay

    And therefore selling (or taking) bees from an infested area (which would have Varroa for sure) to, say, Mull, Orkney, Caithness, Ardnamurchan, Moidart, parts of W Ross and Sutherland would be illegal too?

    Sent from my BlackBerry 8520 using Tapatalk

  10. #10

    Default

    It's unlikely there would be any proper enforcement though that's the problem with most rules /laws where there is no proper authority to pursue offenders

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •