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Thread: Rose Hives

  1. #11

    Default Re: Rose Hives

    I don't think it is the box that matters. I think the method can be applied to most hive types. If I were to do this method, I would use national poly deeps. If you sell nucs it would be less likely to cause problems and is also a much better material than ply. More expensive but will save money over the years by lasting longer and better yields.

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  2. #12

    Default Re: Rose Hives

    Fair point Ely.. the weight of the poly would be perfect for the rose method if using nationals (wouldn't fancy it in cedar) probably would have been my choice if I wasn't so keen to make mine, and be the bin hoaker that I am, using second hand materials were possible

    But the methods are just something else in my arsenal, if I want to follow more traditional methods I am free to... We have to do what suits our own situations

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  3. #13

    Default Re: Rose Hives

    I agree. I doubt anyone follows any book to the letter. It's nice to learn and implement what suits to make things easy

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  4. #14
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    How does the size of the Rose box compare with others, National, Langstroth and so on?

  5. #15

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    I run quite a few in a similar manner, but just using standard national deeps,they are just over an inch deeper than the Rose box, i much prefer all same size frames, and am slowly doing away with shallow boxes altogether.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete L View Post
    I run quite a few in a similar manner, but just using standard national deeps,they are just over an inch deeper than the Rose box, i much prefer all same size frames, and am slowly doing away with shallow boxes altogether.
    Have you ever tried lugging a full national brood box over wet muddy fields - full to the brim with honey?. You wouldnt change from shallows then in a hurry. You would end up with a seriously sore back in no time.I dont intend changeing from my national polyhives but I think the Rose system deserves a serious look which is the exercise I intend carrying out this summer. As I said before the boxes (same construction as wooden national boxes in western red cedar but 1 1/2 inches shallower) will make good supers later on. Quite a few of our association members have read the Rose Hive book and seem quite taken with his system. I don't like the way his hives are constructed - the ones I checked over from thornes were both heavy and made with very poor quality materials - full of huge knots and junk plywood. I have a workshop full of woodworking equipment so making 7 1/2 ( 190 mm) deep national brood bodies in cedarwood is no problem.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by GRIZZLY View Post
    Have you ever tried lugging a full national brood box over wet muddy fields - full to the brim with honey?.You wouldnt change from shallows then in a hurry.

    I have a workshop full of woodworking equipment so making 7 1/2 ( 190 mm) deep national brood bodies in cedarwood is no problem.
    Yes i have, many a time, and i don't really find them that heavy, (it is the empty ones i dislike carrying) so still prefer standard national deeps, the cedar boxes are lighter than the plywood rose model. Although i do also have five sons, two who work with me full time, and the machinery for lifting and getting across rough terrain when needed, although i tend to use a bit more common sense as to the location of the apiary sites these days.

    Like yourself, we have workshops similar, plus sawmill, heavy log handling equipment and timber kilns, and usually produce in excess of 1000 cedar hives a year, and many thousands of frames. All that all of us need now though is a decent seasons weather.
    Last edited by Pete L; 26-03-2013 at 03:07 PM.

  8. #18

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    I’ve read the book about the Rose method and was very taken with it. I am seriously thinking of using all national brood frames in my hives and if too heavy have thought of using dummy frames at each side. Not using a queen excluder really appeals to me but can’t get over the fact I’d be extracting honey from frames that have contained brood. D’know why, it just doesn’t seem right!

  9. #19

    Default Re: Rose Hives

    All honey before abbe Collins invented it around 1865ish was from comb that had reared brood and been cleaned for honey stores. Wild honey hunters still gather it and you pay extortionate amounts for it.
    I still want to eat honey even though i know it as been shared and regurgitated by lots of bees before storage.
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  10. #20
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    And the honey from the warre system is stored in comb which previously had brood reared in it as the normal warre system involves adding supers (subs?) underneath.

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