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Thread: Rose Hives

  1. #1
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    Default Rose Hives

    Hi Everyone,

    So, after 3 years or so, what is the verdict on Rose Hives? Has anyone tried or are using them?

    Would anyone be willing to allow me to visit to see / talk first hand?

    Thanks

    Steve

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    Hi

    Here in Germany and more so in Russia hives tend to be a standard size by area: on the continent 'RoseHives'= keeping bees on one size of magazine, is the standard practice .
    Here in S Germany 80% use Zander. This has an advantage that everyones kit is compatable (people buying my colonies can slot them right into their boxes), the suppliers carry only two standard sizes of kit (making everything cheaper due to better bulk prices - my local suppleir just ordered 20000 frames) frames, foundation, are dirt cheap - these are the running costs after purchase. (I pay 1,20 for a frame with foundation)

    So what is the point in supers? Half sized Frames - unless you want to harvest speciality honey on a weekly basis-who has time for that?

    BR
    Calum
    Last edited by Calum; 04-02-2013 at 10:47 AM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Default

    I've read the book, but have no experience of the hives themselves. I decided against the Rose hive because, as far as I know, the frames aren't that easily available apart from Thornes.

    Calum's point of compatibility with neighbours (or even your own hives, if you have other kinds) is a good one. You will be able to fit a National super into your Rose hive and let the bees draw out comb below it, but a National brood frame will be too big. It's ok the other way round.

    Then there's the plywood sides that I don't like. See Nicky's thread called 'Mould'.
    Kitta
    Last edited by Mellifera Crofter; 05-02-2013 at 08:33 AM. Reason: Changed brood 'box' to brood 'frame'

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    Default

    Thanks everyone, appreciated.

    Kitta, I'll check the thread . Thanks

    Steve

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    I think the principle is fine, but I don't think it requires yet another hive type/frame size to achieve and I think if I were going to go down a one size route I'd either go all Deep National or all Shallow National boxes, any bigger as a solo beekeeper would be too heavy for me I think.

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    I and a fellow member of our ass'n are making some "Rose" hive boxes at the moment. Same construction as a standard national - but without the fancy joints - Just screwed together and made from western red cedar. These will weigh about half the weight of the boxes made by Thornes from red deal and plywood. We are doing this for evaluation purposes - the Rose system seems most plausible and it will be nice to run some hives without Q excluders. If we "tweak" the design slightly and make the cedar side walls about 1 1/2 mm less in thickness we should be able to get 12 frames ( 35mm wide) in the box. The frames are no problem - just cut down and re-slot standard DN4 side bars to suit.Same thing with the wax.
    Last edited by GRIZZLY; 12-02-2013 at 05:37 PM.

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    It doesn't get simpler than this does it? except the floor - way to complicated. Two a wooden n-u with a varroa grille sandwiched inbetween is much easier...

  8. #8

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    Steve I have been on Rose hives ever since I started 2 summers ago. I completed my prelim course but didnt get bees for a year, in the interim period I looked at all the options and decided I wanted to make my own hives so went with OSB for simplicity,and the method described by tim rowe in his book seemed fairly sensible to me, although everything i learnt on my course could pretty much be done using OSB. I make no claims to have lots of experience but one thing I have found is the ease of making splits with the OSB is great!

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    Well we've made up 10 r0se hive depth brood/super boxes, ready for this coming season to evaluate the "Rose" system. They're just shallow national brood boxes realy and if the rose system does'nt work for us they will make extra depth supers. Weight for weight these boxes are lighter than the rose hives manufactured by Thornes and, being made of western red cedar, will be more durable. Perhaps brothermoo will post his experiences on the forum.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Rose Hives

    If I have bees after this eternal winter I will happily share how this year goes on the rose hives.

    Let's hope aslan is on the move

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