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Thread: Straining or filtering

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Default Straining or filtering

    I saw a website advertising:

    Our honey is never heated over 115F and is only strained, never filtered.
    Is there a difference between 'straining' and 'filtering'? I can't see a difference in the use of the term when looking at products for sale in bee supply shops.

    Kitta

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    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
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    I presume they mean that the honey just goes through a mesh by gravity rather than any industrial process where honey can be forced through 'filters' at temperature and pressure.

    I can't say that I know at what stage a strainer becomes a filter..

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    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Thanks Adam - I suppose you're right.
    Kitta

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    In industry, a strainer is used to remove coarse particles and a filter is used to remove much finer particles. Strainers tend to be mesh , whilst Filters are supplied in all sorts of materials and can remove particles down to very small micron sizes. Filter your coffee and strain your "greens".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mellifera Crofter View Post
    and is only strained, never filtered.
    Is there a difference between 'straining' and 'filtering'?
    I've understood that using a double strainer removes almost all wax particles and bits of bee.

    Some people use a 400 micron mesh to filter out pollen and clear the honey for competitions, but might only do it for a few jars because it can take quite a long time to drip through.

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    Senior Member Adam's Avatar
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    I've never used anything other than a double strainer, and that's ok for me. I've never gone in for competitions for honey or wax.

  7. #7

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    Double strainer straight out of the extractor does for me.
    For honey show filter through 200 micron nylon.

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    Senior Member Mellifera Crofter's Avatar
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    Thanks all - I understand. I entered a couple of jars in this year's honey show, but there were just two of us in the novice section - so I won a prize despite my honey having been strained only. I'll filter a few jars through a fine mesh for next year's show.
    Kitta

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mellifera Crofter View Post
    Thanks all - I understand. I entered a couple of jars in this year's honey show, but there were just two of us in the novice section - so I won a prize despite my honey having been strained only. I'll filter a few jars through a fine mesh for next year's show.
    Kitta
    Fine filter out the coarser bits ( bees legs ,wax cappngs etc) then warm honey gently and filter thro' 400 micron cloth. This is usually a nylon jam bag from your local ironmonger , or, you can buy the expensive one from Thornes.

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